| Sunbird Tours Ltd | Ngorongoro | Serengeti |

subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link
subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link | subglobal2 link
subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link
subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link
subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link
subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link
subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link
subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link
||Home | About Us| Accommodation | Wildlife Gallery | Contact Us |

Historical Sites

small logogiraffe logo

On the Swahili Coast, Indian Ocean trade began as early as 400 BC between Greece and Azania, as the area was commonly known. Around the 4th century AD, coastal towns and trading settlements attracted Bantu-speaking peoples from the African hinterland. They settled around mercantile areas and often facilitated trading with the Arabs and Persians, who bartered for slaves, gold, ivory, and spices, sailing north with the monsoon wind. Between the 13th and 15th centuries, the civilizations of Kilwa Kisiwani and the Zanzibar Archipelago reached their peak, with a highly cosmopolitan population of Indian, Arab and African merchants trading in luxury goods that reached as far as China. The completion of Portuguese domination in 1525 meant that trade, for a short time, was lessened, but rival Omani Arab influences soon took control of the caravan routes and regained complete control of the islands, even going so far as to make Zanzibar the capital of Oman in the 1840s.

In the late 19th century, British influence in the Zanzibar Archipelago, in contrast to German influence on the Tanzanian mainland, slowly suppressed the slave trade and brought the area under the influence of the Empire. Local rebellions in German East Africa, most notably the Maji Maji rebellion from 1905 to 1907, slowly weakened the colonizer’s grip on the nation and at the end of the First World War Germany ceded Tanganyika to English administration. Under the leadership of Julius Nyerere, popularly referred to as Mwalimu, or ‘teacher,’ Tanganyika achieved full independence in 1962. Meanwhile, a popular revolution in Zanzibar ousted the Omani Arabs and established majority rule in 1963. A year later, the United Republic of Tanzania was formed, unifying the Tanganyika mainland with the semi-autonomous islands of the Zanzibar Archipelago.

Some historical sites:

Engaruka

These are mysterious ruins of complex irrigation systems spanning the area around Engaruka,the remnants of a highly developed but unknown civilization that inhabited the area at least 500yrs ago and then vanished without a trace.

engaruka

 

 

 

 

 

Kilwa Kisiwani

The indigenous stone and coral structures of Songo Mnara on the southeast coast of Tanzania, and Kilwa Kivinje and Kilwa Kisiwani on nearby islands, reflect the influence of local trade with the Middle East, Western Europe, and Asia. Significant sites include Kilwa Kisiwani's Great Mosque—its tenth-century prayer hall is the oldest standing ruin at the site—and the island's primary fort, constructed by the Portuguese in 1505. Kilwa Kivinje developed into a regional center in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, largely as a result of the slave and ivory trades. Kilwa Kisiwani and Songo Mnara were inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1981, and the listing was expanded in 2004 to include Kilwa Kivinje.

kilwa

 

 

 

 

 

Lindi

The port town of lindi in south-western tanzania was the final stop of slave caravans from lake nyasa during the heyday of the zanzibari sultans.In 1909,a team of German palaeontologists unearthed the remains of several dinosaur bones in Tendanguru,including the species Brachiosaurus brancai,the largest discovered dinosour in the world.

lindi

 

 

 

 

Mikindani

Another central port in the swahili coasts network of indian ocean trade ,in the 15th century Mikindany's reach extended as far as the African hinterlands of Congo and Zambia.The area became a center of German colonial center in the 1880s and a chief exporter of sisal,coconuts and slaves.

mikindani

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olduvai Gorge


Olduvai Gorge is an archaeological site located in the eastern Serengeti Plains, which is in northern Tanzania. The gorge is a very steep sided ravine roughly 30 miles long and 295 ft. deep. Exposed deposits show rich fossil fauna, many hominid remains and items belonging to the one of the oldest stone tool technologies, called Olduwan. The time span of the objects recovered date from 2,100,000 to 15,000 years ago.

The main Olduvai Beds are in a lake basin about 16 miles in diameter. The rocks under the basin date to 5.3 million years ago. There have been seven major Beds distinguished they are ranked from oldest to youngest; Bed I, Bed II, Bed III, Bed IV, the Masek Beds, the Ndutu Beds, and Baisiusiu Beds.

Bed I dates to 2,100,000 years old and is 197 feet thick. It is mainly formed of lava flows, volcanic-ash deposits and other sediments. The upper part of the bed contains varied fauna and evidence of the Olduwan industry. Skeletal remains of hominids are assigned to the Homo Habilis an Australopithecus Boisei families. Campsites and what is believed to be a butchery site have also been excavated from this bed.

The Hominid living sites in Bed I are found mainly where streams from the volcanic highlands carried fresh water to Olduvai lake. The conditions for the preservation of the sites is mainly due to the ash falls from the nearby volcanoes and the inconsistency of the lake's depth. The debris found at the sites are various Olduwan tools, bone and teeth from animals, mainly from fair sized antelopes. Also a loosely built circle of lava blocks was found, suggesting that crude shelters were formed here as well.

 

olduvai

 

 

| ©2011 Sunbird Tours Ltd.Web Design by Nathaniel Obed Obede |